fbpx

All Children’s Guild Alliance’s schools are currently providing distance learning. Our staff is working remotely and maintaining regular operating hours. View our COVID-19 resources addressing the needs of children and families.

Select Page

Devin is a 7-year-old second-grade student at The Children’s Guild School of Prince George’s County. He has Asperger’s, a developmental and social disability on the higher end of the autism spectrum, and his mother is cautious about trying out new things and putting Devin into unfamiliar environments. When given the opportunity to participate in League of Dreams, Mrs. Murray says, “I didn’t know how my son would respond.” Even though she had her concerns, she took Devin and his two brothers to participate in the events and learn the game of baseball together. “That first experience sparked something in Devin. He loved it, and he really took to the game.” Not only has there been growth and development in Devin, but cultivating a shared interest in baseball has opened the doors for Mrs. Murray’s children to do more things together as a family

Children with emotional and physical challenges have a need to be accepted and given the same opportunities as their peers. Learning a sport, especially one as popular as baseball, is a great way to engage children at all levels. “So many kids are boxed into certain categories. Giving them the chance to play ball inspires growth and the freedom to express themselves,” says Mike Bordick, chair of League of Dreams and a retired professional baseball shortstop who played in Major League Baseball with the Baltimore Orioles, New York Mets, Oakland Athletics, and Toronto Blue Jays.

This year, The Children’s Guild Alliance launched a formal partnership with the League of Dreams to host a series of sports events and develop a curriculum for teaching baseball and softball skills to children with disabilities. The excitement surrounding the partnership continues to grow as more students are introduced to the joy of playing baseball.

“I didn’t know how my son would respond,” says Nicole Murray, mother of 7-year old Devin, a second-grade student at The Children’s Guild School of Prince George’s County. He has Asperger’s, a developmental and social disability on the higher end of the autism spectrum. Mrs. Murray is always cautious about trying out new things and had concerns about how well Devin would be able to listen to instructions and work in a team environment. Her fears were allayed by the patience of the staff. “That first experience sparked something in Devin. He loved it, and he really took to the game.”

Devin has two brothers, and when they attended a weekend League of Dreams event, they were invited to participate as well. Cultivating a shared interest in baseball has opened the doors for Mrs. Murray’s children to do more things together as a family. They recently went to a Nationals’ game, and she was thrilled to see how interested and focused Devin was on the game.

In addition to offering a full-body workout and enhancing gross motor skills, learning how to play baseball and softball teaches the value of teamwork, develops mental focus, and encourages personal growth and confidence. “Teaching kids how to play ball is not a one-time experience. It has a lasting impact and offers lifelong lessons,” says Mr. Bordick.